US Population | US Population By State | US Population By Race | US Population 2019

US Population | US Population By State | US Population By Race | US Population 2019:- The United States is the world’s 3rd or 4th largest country by total area and slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe’s 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 328 million people, the U.S. is the 3rd most populated country. The capital of United States is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population in New York. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, covered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean.

 

US Population:

Talking about the population of US, in order to check out the population of US in 2019, we need to have a look at the US population of the past 5 years. They are as per the following:

  • 2014 – 317 Million
  • 2015 – 320 Million
  • 2016 – 322 Million
  • 2017 – 324.5 Million
  • 2018 – 326.7 Million
  • US Population 2019 – 328 Million (Estimated)

Getting from the past data of the US from the year 2014-18, it has been seen that every year the population increases by 1.98 Million. Hence, the population of US in 2019 is forecasted to be 328 Million. So, the population of USA in the year 2019 as per estimated data 328 Million.

US Population 2019 – 328 Million (Estimated)

 

US Population | US Population By State | US Population By Race | US Population 2019

Population of the United States (2019 and historical)

Year Population Yearly %
Change
Yearly
Change
Migrants Fertility Rate Density (P/Km²) Urban
Pop %
Country’s Share of
World Pop
2019 329,093,110 0.71 % 2,326,362 900,000 1.88 36 83.9 % 4.27 %
2018 326,766,748 0.71 % 2,307,285 900,000 1.88 36 83.7 % 4.28 %
2017 324,459,463 0.71 % 2,279,858 900,000 1.88 35 83.4 % 4.30 %
2016 322,179,605 0.70 % 2,250,443 900,000 1.88 35 83.2 % 4.31 %
2015 319,929,162 0.72 % 2,257,554 900,000 1.88 35 82.9 % 4.33 %
2010 308,641,391 0.90 % 2,702,378 1,006,738 2.05 34 81.7 % 4.44 %
2005 295,129,501 0.92 % 2,629,345 1,041,308 2.04 32 80.8 % 4.51 %
2000 281,982,778 1.20 % 3,264,786 1,722,415 2.00 31 79.8 % 4.59 %
1995 265,658,849 1.02 % 2,625,780 903,362 2.03 29 77.9 % 4.62 %
1990 252,529,950 0.95 % 2,341,166 685,748 1.91 28 75.9 % 4.74 %
1985 240,824,120 0.94 % 2,212,214 680,452 1.80 26 74.8 % 4.94 %
1980 229,763,052 0.95 % 2,111,551 785,362 1.77 25 73.9 % 5.15 %

 

United States Population Forecast

Year Population Yearly %
Change
Migrants Median Age Fertility Rate Density (P/Km²) Urban
Pop %
2020 331,431,534 0.71 % 900,000 38.3 1.89 36 84.1 %
2025 343,255,846 0.70 % 950,001 39.0 1.89 38 85.1 %
2030 354,711,670 0.66 % 1,000,000 39.8 1.90 39 86.1 %
2035 365,033,872 0.58 % 1,000,000 40.6 1.90 40 87.0 %
2040 374,068,752 0.49 % 1,000,000 41.2 1.91 41 88.0 %
2045 382,058,853 0.42 % 1,000,000 41.7 1.91 42 88.9 %
2050 389,591,663 0.39 % 1,000,000 42.0 1.91 43 89.9 %

 

Demography of the United States

The United States is the 3rd most populated country in the world with an estimated population of 328,953,020 as of November 8, 2018. The United States is highly urbanized, with 82.3% of the population residing in cities and suburbs. California and Texas are the most populated states, as the mean center of U.S. population have consistently shifted westward and southward. New York City is the most populated city in the US.

The total fertility rate in the US estimated for 2017 is 1.77 children per woman, which is below the replacement fertility rate of approximately 2.1.

White people constitute the majority of the United States population, with a total of about 77.7% of the population as of 2013. The non-Hispanic white population of the United States is expected to fall below 50% by 2045. According to the Pew Research Center study released in 2018, by 2040, Islam will surpass Judaism to become the 2nd largest religion in the US due to higher immigration and birth rates.

The Census Bureau projects a U.S. population of 417 million in 2k60, a 38% increase from 2007 (301.3 million), and the United Nations estimates the United States population will be 402 million in 2050, an increase of 32% from 2007.

 

US Population By Age

As of November 8, 2018, the US is estimated to have a population of 328,953,020.

The median age of the total United States population is 38.1 years; the male median age is 36.8 years; the female median age is 39.4 years.

The United States population is distributed by age as follows:

  • 0–14 years: 18.73% (male 31,255,995/female 29,919,938)
  • 15–24 years: 13.27% (male 22,213,952/female 21,137,826)
  • 25–54 years: 39.45% (male 64,528,673/female 64,334,499)
  • 55–64 years: 12.91% (male 20,357,880/female 21,821,976)
  • 65 years and over: 15.63% (male 22,678,235/female 28,376,817)

Sex ratios in the United States:

  • 0–14 years: 1.04 male/female
  • 15–24 years: 1.05 male/female
  • 25–54 years: 1 male/female
  • 55–64 years: 0.93 male/female
  • 65 years and over: 0.79 male/female
  • Total population: 0.97 male/female

 

Life expectancy in US

  • Total population: 80 years
  • Male: 78 years
  • Female: 82 years

 

Population Density in US

The most densely populated state In United States is New Jersey (1,121/mi2 or 433/km2).

 

US Immigration and emigration

Net migration rate: 3.9 migrants/1,000 population

13% of the United States population was foreign-born in 2009 – a rise of 350% since 1970 when foreign-born people accounted for 3.7% of the population, including 11.2 million illegal immigrants, 80% of whom come from Latin America. Latin America is the largest region-of-birth group, accounting for over half (53%) of all foreign born population in United States, and this is also the largest source of both legal and illegal immigration to the US.

New Legal Permanent Residents, Top 5 Sending Countries, 2011
Country 2011
Mexico 143,446
China 87,016
India 69,013
Philippines 57,011
Dominican Rep. 46,019

 

New Legal Permanent Residents by Region, 2011
Region 2011
Asia 451,593
Americas 419,996
Africa 100,336
Europe 83,635
All immigrants 1,062,040

 

Race and ethnicity in the United States

United States has a racially and ethnically diverse population. The US Census officially recognizes 6 racial categories: White or European American, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Other Pacific Islander, and people of two or more races; a category called “some other race” is also used in the census and other surveys, but is not official.

As of July 2016, White Americans are the racial majority in the United States. African Americans are the largest racial minority, amounting to an estimated 12.7% of the United States population.

 

US Population By Race

According to the 2010–2015 American Community Survey, the 20 largest ancestry groups in the US were (see above for the OMB self-designation options):

Rank Race Population Percent of total population
1 German 46,403,053 14.7%
2 Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 38,785,726 12.3%
3 Mexican (of any race) 34,640,287 10.9%
4 Irish 33,526,444 10.6%
5 English 24,787,018 7.8%
6 American 22,746,991 7.2%
7 Italian 17,285,619 5.5%
8 Polish 9,385,766 3.0%
9 French 8,272,538 2.6%
10 Scottish 5,409,343 1.7%
11 Puerto Rican (of any race) 5,174,554 1.6%
12 Norwegian 4,445,030 1.4%
13 Dutch 4,289,116 1.4%
14 Swedish 3,933,024 1.2%
15 Chinese 3,852,099 1.2%
16 Asian Indian 3,303,512 1.0%
17 Scotch-Irish 3,046,005 1.0%
18 Russian 2,843,400 0.9%
19 West Indian (non-Hispanic) 2,824,722 0.9%
20 Filipino 2,717,844 0.9%

 

According to the 2010–2015 US American Community Survey, the racial composition of the United States in 2015 was:

Race Population (2016 est.) Share of total population
Total 318,558,162 100%
One race 308,805,215 96.9%
  White 233,657,078 73.3%
  Black or African American 40,241,818 12.6%
  American Indian and Alaska Native 2,597,817 0.8%
  Asian 16,614,625 5.2%
  Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 560,021 0.2%
  Other races 15,133,856 4.8%
Two or more races 9,752,947 3.1%
  White and Black or African American 2,525,509 0.8%
  White and US Indian and Alaska Native 1,884,407 0.6%
  White and Asian 1,956,740 0.6%
  African American and American Indian and Alaska Native 318,302 0.1%

 

US Population by race 1940-2010

Years 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000* 2010*
White 89.8 89.5 88.6 87.5 83.0 80.3 75.1 72.4
Black or African American 9.8 10.0 10.5 11.1 11.7 12.1 12.3 12.6
American Indian and Alaska Native 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9
Asian and Native Hawaiian
and other Pacific Islander
1.5 2.9 3.8 5.0
Other race 3.0 3.9 5.5 6.2
Two or more races 2.4 2.9
Sum (%) 99.6 99.5 99.1 98.6 100 100 100 100

 

Racial breakdown of US population by state

Racial breakdown of population by state, 2015
State or territory White Black or
African American
American Indian
and Alaska Native
Asian Native Hawaiian and
Other Pacific Islander
Some other race Two or more races
Alabama 68.8% 26.4% 0.5% 1.2% 0.1% 1.3% 1.7%
Alaska 66.0% 3.4% 13.8% 5.9% 1.2% 1.3% 8.4%
Arizona 78.4% 4.2% 4.4% 3.0% 0.2% 6.5% 3.2%
Arkansas 78.0% 15.5% 0.6% 1.4% 0.2% 2.1% 2.1%
California 61.8% 5.9% 0.7% 13.7% 0.4% 12.9% 4.5%
Colorado 84.2% 4.0% 0.9% 2.9% 0.1% 4.3% 3.5%
Connecticut 77.3% 10.3% 0.2% 4.2% 0.0% 5.1% 2.8%
Delaware 69.4% 21.6% 0.3% 3.6% 0.0% 2.3% 2.7%
District of Columbia 40.2% 48.9% 0.3% 3.7% 0.0% 4.2% 2.7%
Florida 76.0% 16.1% 0.3% 2.6% 0.1% 2.5% 2.4%
Georgia 60.2% 30.9% 0.3% 3.6% 0.0% 2.8% 2.1%
Hawaii 25.4% 2.0% 0.2% 37.7% 9.9% 1.1% 23.7%
Idaho 91.7% 0.6% 1.3% 1.3% 0.1% 2.4% 2.6%
Illinois 72.3% 14.3% 0.2% 5.0% 0.0% 5.8% 2.2%
Indiana 84.2% 9.2% 0.2% 1.9% 0.0% 2.3% 2.2%
Iowa 91.2% 3.2% 0.3% 2.0% 0.1% 1.3% 2.0%
Kansas 85.2% 5.8% 0.8% 2.6% 0.1% 2.2% 3.3%
Kentucky 87.6% 7.9% 0.2% 1.3% 0.0% 0.9% 2.1%
Louisiana 62.8% 32.1% 0.6% 1.7% 0.0% 1.0% 1.8%
Maine 95.0% 1.1% 0.6% 1.1% 0.0% 0.2% 2.0%
Maryland 57.6% 29.5% 0.3% 6.0% 0.0% 3.6% 3.0%
Massachusetts 79.6% 7.1% 0.2% 6.0% 0.0% 4.2% 2.9%
Michigan 79.0% 14.0% 0.5% 2.7% 0.0% 1.1% 2.6%
Minnesota 84.8% 5.5% 1.0% 4.4% 0.0% 1.5% 2.7%
Mississippi 59.2% 37.4% 0.4% 1.0% 0.0% 0.9% 1.2%
Missouri 82.6% 11.5% 0.4% 1.8% 0.1% 1.1% 2.4%
Montana 89.2% 0.5% 6.5% 0.7% 0.1% 0.5% 2.5%
Nebraska 88.1% 4.7% 0.9% 2.0% 0.1% 1.9% 2.2%
Nevada 69.0% 8.4% 1.1% 7.7% 0.6% 8.8% 4.4%
New Hampshire 93.7% 1.3% 0.2% 2.4% 0.0% 0.5% 1.8%
New Jersey 68.3% 13.5% 0.2% 9.0% 0.0% 6.4% 2.5%
New Mexico 73.2% 2.1% 9.1% 1.4% 0.1% 10.9% 3.3%
New York 64.6% 15.6% 0.4% 8.0% 0.0% 8.6% 2.9%
North Carolina 69.5% 21.5% 1.2% 2.5% 0.1% 3.0% 2.4%
North Dakota 88.7% 1.6% 5.3% 1.2% 0.0% 0.8% 2.2%
Ohio 82.4% 12.2% 0.2% 1.9% 0.0% 0.8% 2.5%
Oklahoma 73.1% 7.2% 7.3% 1.9% 0.1% 2.6% 7.8%
Oregon 85.1% 1.8% 1.2% 4.0% 0.4% 3.4% 4.1%
Pennsylvania 81.6% 11.0% 0.2% 3.1% 0.0% 2.0% 2.1%
Rhode Island 81.1% 6.5% 0.5% 3.2% 0.0% 5.8% 2.8%
South Carolina 67.2% 27.5% 0.3% 1.4% 0.1% 1.5% 2.0%
South Dakota 85.0% 1.6% 8.6% 1.2% 0.0% 0.9% 2.6%
Tennessee 77.8% 16.8% 0.3% 1.6% 0.1% 1.5% 2.0%
Texas 74.9% 11.9% 0.5% 4.2% 0.1% 6.0% 2.5%
Utah 87.6% 1.1% 1.1% 2.2% 0.9% 4.5% 2.6%
Vermont 94.9% 1.1% 0.3% 1.4% 0.0% 0.3% 1.9%
Virginia 69.0% 19.2% 0.3% 6.0% 0.1% 2.2% 3.2%
Washington 77.8% 3.6% 1.3% 7.7% 0.6% 3.8% 5.2%
West Virginia 93.6% 3.3% 0.2% 0.7% 0.0% 0.2% 2.0%
Wisconsin 86.5% 6.3% 0.9% 2.5% 0.0% 1.7% 2.1%
Wyoming 91.0% 1.1% 2.2% 0.9% 0.1% 2.1% 2.7%
Puerto Rico 69.7% 8.4% 0.3% 0.3% 0.0% 12.0% 9.3%

 

US Population By States and Territories

Rank in the fifty states, 2018 State, federal district, or territory Population estimate, July 1, 2018 Census population, April 1, 2010 Percent increase from 2010-2018 Percent of the total U.S. population, 2018
1  California 39,557,045 37,252,895 6.19% 11.96%
2  Texas 28,701,845 25,146,105 14.14% 8.68%
3  Florida 21,299,325 18,804,623 13.27% 6.44%
4  New York 19,542,209 19,378,087 0.85% 5.91%
5  Pennsylvania 12,807,060 12,702,887 0.82% 3.87%
6  Illinois 12,741,080 12,831,549 -0.71% 3.85%
7  Ohio 11,689,442 11,536,725 1.32% 3.53%
8  Georgia 10,519,475 9,688,681 8.57% 3.18%
9  North Carolina 10,383,620 9,535,692 8.89% 3.14%
10  Michigan 9,998,915 9,884,129 1.13% 3.02%
11  New Jersey 9,032,873 8,791,936 2.74% 2.69%
12  Virginia 8,517,685 8,001,045 6.46% 2.58%
13  Washington 7,535,591 6,724,543 12.06% 2.28%
14  Arizona 7,171,646 6,392,307 12.19% 2.17%
15  Massachusetts 6,902,149 6,547,817 5.41% 2.09%
16  Tennessee 6,770,010 6,346,275 6.68% 2.05%
17  Indiana 6,691,878 6,484,229 3.20% 2.02%
18  Missouri 6,126,452 5,988,927 2.30% 1.85%
19  Maryland 6,042,718 5,773,785 4.66% 1.83%
20  Wisconsin 5,813,568 5,687,289 2.22% 1.76%
21  Colorado 5,695,564 5,029,324 13.25% 1.72%
22  Minnesota 5,611,179 5,303,925 5.79% 1.70%
23  South Carolina 5,084,127 4,625,401 9.92% 1.54%
24  Alabama 4,887,871 4,780,127 2.25% 1.48%
25  Louisiana 4,659,978 4,533,479 2.79% 1.41%

 

US Population By Cities

The following is a list of the most populated cities of the United States.

2017
rank
City 2017
estimate
2010
Census
Change 2016 population density
1 New York 8,622,698 8,175,133 +5.47% 28,317/sq mi 10,933/km2
2 Los Angeles 3,999,759 3,792,621 +5.46% 8,484/sq mi 3,276/km2
3 Chicago 2,716,450 2,695,598 +0.77% 11,900/sq mi 4,600/km2
4 Houston 2,312,717 2,100,263 +10.12% 3,613/sq mi 1,395/km2
5 Phoenix 1,626,078 1,445,632 +12.48% 3,120/sq mi 1,200/km2
6 Philadelphia 1,580,863 1,526,006 +3.59% 11,683/sq mi 4,511/km2
7 San Antonio 1,511,946 1,327,407 +13.90% 3,238/sq mi 1,250/km2
8 San Diego 1,419,516 1,307,402 +8.58% 4,325/sq mi 1,670/km2
9 Dallas 1,341,075 1,197,816 +11.96% 3,866/sq mi 1,493/km2
10 San Jose 1,035,317 945,942 +9.45% 5,777/sq mi 2,231/km2
11 Austin 950,715 790,390 +20.28% 3,031/sq mi 1,170/km2
12 Jacksonville 892,062 821,784 +8.55% 1,178/sq mi 455/km2
13 San Francisco 884,363 805,235 +9.83% 18,569/sq mi 7,170/km2
14 Columbus 879,170 787,033 +11.71% 3,936/sq mi 1,520/km2
15 Fort Worth 874,168 741,206 +17.94% 2,491/sq mi 962/km2
16 Indianapolis 863,002 820,445 +5.19% 2,366/sq mi 914/km2
17 Charlotte 859,035 731,424 +17.45% 2,757/sq mi 1,064/km2
18 Seattle 724,745 608,660 +19.07% 8,405/sq mi 3,245/km2
19 Denver 704,621 600,158 +17.41% 4,521/sq mi 1,746/km2
20 Washington 693,972 601,723 +15.33% 11,148/sq mi 4,304/km2
21 Boston 685,094 617,594 +10.93% 13,938/sq mi 5,381/km2
22 El Paso 683,577 649,121 +5.31% 2,660/sq mi 1,030/km2
23 Detroit 673,104 713,777 −5.70% 4,847/sq mi 1,871/km2
24 Nashville 667,560 601,222 +11.03% 1,388/sq mi 536/km2
25 Memphis 652,236 646,889 +0.83% 2,056/sq mi 794/km2

 

The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the United States’s population to be 327,167,434 as of July 1, 2018, and to be adding 1 person (net gain) every 13 seconds, or about 6,646 people per day. The United States is The third most populated nation in the world, after China and India. Foreign-born immigration has caused the U.S. population to continue its rapid increase with the foreign-born people doubling from almost 20 million in 1990 to over 40 million in 2010, representing one-third of the population increase. The foreign-born US population reached 45 million in 2015.

White Americans (mostly European race group with 73.1% of total population) are the largest racial group; black Americans are the nation’s largest racial minority(note that in the U.S. Census, Hispanic and Latino Americans are counted as an ethnic group, not a “racial” group), and 3rd-largest ancestry group. Asian Americans are the country’s 2nd-largest racial minority; the three largest Asian American ethnic groups are Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, and Indian Americans. In 2010, the United States population included an estimated 5.2 million people with some American Indian or Alaska Native ancestry (2.9 million exclusively of such ancestry) and 1.2 million with some native Hawaiian or Pacific island race (0.5 million).

The US has a birth rate of 13 per 1,000, which is 5 births below the world average. In the fiscal year 2016, over 1 million immigrants were granted legal residence. Mexico has been the top source of new peoples since the 1965 Immigration Act. China, India, and the Philippines have been in the top 4 sending countries every year since the 1990s. As of 2012, approximately 11.4 million peoples are illegal immigrants. The percentage of migrants from Asian is increasing while the percentage who are Hispanic is decreasing. The estimated number of illegal immigrants dropped to 10.7 million in 2017, down from a peak of 12.2 million in 2007. In 2017, 33,000 refugees were resettled in the US. A 2k17 Gallup poll concluded that 4.5% of adult Americans identified as LGBT with 5.1% of women identifying as LGBT, compared with 3.9% of men.

About 82% of Peoples live in urban areas (including suburbs). The U.S. has four global cities had over two million people (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Houston).

 

Languages of the United States

The most commonly used language in the US is English (American English). Many other languages are also spoken in the US.

Most common languages In US spoken at home by people

  1. English only – 229.7 million
  2. Spanish – 40.5 million
  3. Chinese (including Mandarin and Cantonese) – 3.4 million
  4. Tagalog (including Filipino) – 1.7 million
  5. Vietnamese – 1.5 million
  6. Arabic – 1.2 million
  7. French – 1.2 million
  8. Korean – 1.1 million
  9. Russian – 0.91 million
  10. German – 0.91 million
  11. Haitian Creole – 0.86 million
  12. Hindi – 0.81 million
  13. Portuguese – 0.77 million
  14. Italian – 0.58 million
  15. Polish – 0.54 million
  16. Urdu – 0.47 million
  17. Japanese – 0.46 million
  18. Persian (including Farsi and Dari) – 0.44 million
  19. Gujarati – 0.41 million
  20. Telugu – 0.37 million
  21. Bengali – 0.32 million
  22. Tai–Kadai (including Thai and Lao) – 0.31 million
  23. Greek – 0.29 million
  24. Punjabi – 0.29 million
  25. Tamil – 0.27 million
  26. Armenian – 0.24 million
  27. Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin, and Serbian) – 0.24 million
  28. Hebrew – 0.23 million
  29. Hmong – 0.22 million
  30. Bantu (including Swahili) – 0.22 million
  31. Khmer – 0.20 million
  32. Navajo – 0.16 million

 

Religion in the United States

In a 2013 survey, 56% of People said that religion played a “very important role in their lives”, a far higher figure than that of any other wealthy nation. As with other Western countries, the U.S. is becoming less religious. Irreligion is growing rapidly among people’s under 30.

According to a 2014 survey, 70.6% of adults in the US identified themselves as Christians; Protestants accounted for 46.5%, while Roman Catholics, at 20.8%, formed the largest single denomination. In 2014, 5.9% of the United States adult population claimed a non-Christian religion. These include Judaism (1.9%), Hinduism (1.2%), Buddhism (0.9%), and Islam (0.9%). The survey also reported that 22.8% of Americans described themselves as atheist or simply having no religion—up from 8.2% in 1990.

Protestantism is the largest Christian religious grouping in the US, accounting for almost half of all Americans. Roman Catholicism in the US has its origin primarily in the Spanish and French colonization of the Americas, as well as in the English colony of Maryland. Rhode Island has the highest percentage of Catholics, with 40 percent of the total population of United States. Utah is the only state in United States where Mormonism is the religion of the majority of the population.

Religion in US (2016)

  •   Christianity (73.7%)
  •   Judaism (2.1%)
  •   Islam (0.8%)
  •   Other non-Christian religion (2.5%)
  •   Unaffiliated (18.2%)
  •   Unanswered (2.7%)

 

The economy of the United States

The economy of the US is a highly developed mixed economy. United States is the world’s largest economy by nominal GDP and the 2nd-largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). It also has the world’s 7th-highest per capita GDP (nominal) and the 11th-highest per capita GDP (PPP) in 2016. The US has a highly diversified, world-leading industrial sector. The United States is also a high-technology innovator with the 2nd-largest industrial output in the world. The United States dollar is the currency most used in international transactions and is the world’s foremost reserve currency, backed by its science and technology, its military, the full faith of the U.S. govt to reimburse its debts. United States’s largest trading partners are China, Canada, Mexico, Japan, Germany, South Korea, United Kingdom, France, India, and Taiwan.

The United States’s economy is fueled by abundant natural resources, a well-developed infrastructure, and high productivity. United States has the second-highest total estimated value of natural resources, valued at $45 trillion in 2016. Americans have the highest average household and employee income among OECD nations, and in 2010, they had the 4th-highest median household income, down from 2nd-highest in 2007. The US is the world’s largest producer of oil and natural gas. In 2016, it was the world’s largest trading nation as well as its 2nd-largest manufacturer, representing a fifth of the global manufacturing output. United States also has both the largest economy and the largest industrial sector, at 2005 prices according to the UNCTAD. The United States not only has the largest internal market for goods but also dominates the trade in services. United States total trade amounted to $4.92 trillion in 2016. Of the world’s 500 largest companies, 134 are headquartered in the United States.

The US has one of the world’s largest and most influential financial markets. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is by far the world’s largest stock exchange by market capitalization. Foreign investments made in the United States total almost $2.4 trillion, while American investments in foreign countries total to over $3.3 trillion. The United States economy is ranked first in international ranking on venture capital and Global Research and Development funding. The United States has the world’s largest consumer market, with a household final consumption expenditure five times larger than that of Japan. United States’s labor market has attracted immigrants from all over the world and its net migration rate is among the highest in the world. The US is one of the top-performing economies in studies such as the Ease of Doing Business Index, the Global Competitiveness Report, and others.

The United States economy experienced a serious economic downturn during the Great Recession which technically lasted from Dec 2007 – June 2009. Debt held by the public, a measure of United States national debt, was approximately 77% of GDP in 2017, ranked the 43rd highest out of 207 countries. Income inequality in United States ranked 41st highest among 156 countries in 2017,  and ranks among the highest in income inequality compared to other Western nations.

 

The table shows the main US economic indicators in 1980–2017. Inflation below 2 % is in green.

Year GDP
(in Bil. US-Dollar)
GDP per capita
(in US-Dollar)
GDP growth
(real)
Inflation rate
(in Percent)
Unemployment
(in Percent)
1980 2,862.5 12,575 Decrease−0.2 % Negative increase13.5 % 7.2 %
1981 Increase3,211.0 Increase13,966 Increase2.6 % Negative increase10.4 % Negative increase7.6 %
1982 Increase3,345.0 Increase14,410 Decrease−1.9 % Negative increase6.2 % Negative increase9.7 %
1983 Increase3,638.1 Increase15,531 Increase4.6 % Negative increase3.2 % Positive decrease9.6 %
1984 Increase4,040.7 Increase17,099 Increase7.3 % Negative increase4.4 % Positive decrease7.5 %
1985 Increase4,346.8 Increase18,232 Increase4.2 % Negative increase3.5 % Positive decrease7.2 %
1986 Increase4,590.1 Increase19,078 Increase3.5 % Increase1.9 % Positive decrease7.0 %
1987 Increase4,870.2 Increase20,063 Increase3.5 % Negative increase3.6 % Positive decrease6.2 %
1988 Increase5,252.6 Increase21,442 Increase4.2 % Negative increase4.1 % Positive decrease5.5 %
1989 Increase5,657.7 Increase22,879 Increase3.7 % Negative increase4.8 % Positive decrease5.3 %
1990 Increase5,979.6 Increase23,914 Increase1.9 % Negative increase5.4 % Negative increase5.6 %
1991 Increase6,174.1 Increase24,366 Decrease−0.1 % Negative increase4.2 % Negative increase6.9 %
1992 Increase6,539.3 Increase25,467 Increase3.6 % Negative increase3.0 % Negative increase7.5 %
1993 Increase6,878.7 Increase26,442 Increase2.7 % Negative increase3.0 % Positive decrease6.9 %
1994 Increase7,308.8 Increase27,756 Increase4.0 % Negative increase2.6 % Positive decrease6.1 %
1995 Increase7,664.1 Increase28,763 Increase2.7 % Negative increase2.8 % Positive decrease5.6 %
1996 Increase8,100.1 Increase30,047 Increase3.8 % Negative increase2.9 % Positive decrease5.4 %
1997 Increase8,608.5 Increase31,554 Increase4.5 % Negative increase2.3 % Positive decrease4.9 %
1998 Increase9,089.2 Increase32,929 Increase4.5 % Increase1.5 % Positive decrease4.5 %
1999 Increase9,660.6 Increase34,602 Increase4.7 % Negative increase2.2 % Positive decrease4.2 %
2000 Increase10,284.8 Increase36,433 Increase4.0 % Negative increase3.4 % Positive decrease4.0 %
2001 Increase10,621.9 Increase37,241 Increase1.0 % Negative increase2.8 % Negative increase4.7 %
2002 Increase10,977.5 Increase38,114 Increase1.8 % Increase1.6 % Negative increase5.8 %
2003 Increase11,510.7 Increase39,592 Increase2.8 % Negative increase2.3 % Negative increase6.0 %
2004 Increase12,274.9 Increase41,838 Increase3.8 % Negative increase2.7 % Positive decrease5.5 %
2005 Increase13,093.7 Increase44,218 Increase3.3 % Negative increase3.4 % Positive decrease5.1 %
2006 Increase13,855.9 Increase46,352 Increase2.7 % Negative increase3.2 % Positive decrease4.6 %
2007 Increase14,477.6 Increase47,955 Increase1.8 % Negative increase2.9 % Steady4.6 %
2008 Increase14,718.6 Increase48,302 Decrease−0.3 % Negative increase3.8 % Negative increase5.8 %
2009 Decrease14,418.7 Decrease46,909 Decrease−2.8 % Positive decrease−0.3 % Negative increase9.3 %
2010 Increase14,964.4 Increase48,311 Increase2.5 % Increase1.6 % Negative increase9.6 %
2011 Increase15,517.9 Increase49,736 Increase1.6 % Negative increase3.1 % Positive decrease8.9 %
2012 Increase16,155.3 Increase51,404 Increase2.2 % Negative increase2.1 % Positive decrease8.1 %
2013 Increase16,691.5 Increase52,737 Increase1.7 % Increase1.5 % Positive decrease7.4 %
2014 Increase17,427.6 Increase54,657 Increase2.6 % Increase1.6 % Positive decrease6.2 %
2015 Increase18,120.7 Increase56,411 Increase2.9 % Increase0.1 % Positive decrease5.3 %
2016 Increase18,624.5 Increase57,559 Increase1.5 % Increase1.3 % Positive decrease4.9 %
2017 Increase19,390.6 Increase59,501 Increase2.3 % Negative increase2.1 % Positive decrease4.4 %

 

GDP Of United States

United States nominal GDP was $19.5 trillion in 2017. Annualized, nominal GDP reached $20.1 trillion in Q1 2018, the first time it exceeded the $20 trillion level.

As of 2014, China passed the United States as the largest economy in GDP terms, measured at purchasing power parity conversion rates. The United States was the largest economy for more than a century prior to that milestone; China has more than tripled the U.S. growth rate for each of the past 40 years. As of 2017, the European Union as an aggregate had a GDP roughly 5% larger than the United States.

Real GDP per capita was $52,444 in 2017 and has been growing each year since 2010. The United States ranked 20th out of 220 countries in GDP per capita in 2017.

The development of the United States’s GDP according to World Bank: United States real GDP grew by an average of 1.7% from 2000 to the first half of 2014.

 

Geography

The land area of the entire US is approximately 3,800,000 square miles. The Us is the world’s third- or fourth-largest nation by total area (land and water), ranking behind Russia and Canada and just above or below China. The ranking varies depending on how two territories disputed by China and India are counted, and how the total size of the Us is measured.

 

The US emerged from World War II as a global superpower, the first country to develop nuclear weapons, the only country to use them in warfare, and a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. During the Cold War, the US and the Soviet Union competed in the Space Race, culminating with the 1969 Moon landing. The end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the US as the world’s sole superpower.

The US is a founding member of the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, Organization of American States (OAS), and other international organizations. The US is a highly developed country, with the world’s largest economy by nominal GDP and second-largest economy by PPP, accounting for approximately a quarter of global GDP. The United States economy is largely post-industrial, characterized by the dominance of services and knowledge-based activities, although the manufacturing sector remains the second-largest in the world. The US is the world’s largest importer and the 2nd largest exporter of goods, by value. Although United States’s population is only 4.3% of the world total, the U.S. holds 33% of the total wealth in the world, the largest share of global wealth in a single country. The US is the foremost military power in the world, making up a third of global military spending, and is a leading political, cultural, and scientific force internationally.

 

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